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The craftsmanship of the chef

Here you will see a narrated video of the meticulous crafstmanship of chef.

●De-boning a Hamo (Conger fish)

Hamo have many small bones so here we will view the de-boning process. About 8 or 9 slits are made per centimeter without damaging the skin under it. (A special knife for de-boning Conger fish is used). The piece is placed over boiling water for several seconds, only letting the skin underneath cook. Then it is taken out and cooled in ice water. Only the skin will shrink which causes it look like a blooming flower.

●Daikon no Katsuramuki (Skinning a Radish)

A special knife made for slicing vegetables will be used here. This knife's distinctive design was crafted for the soul purpose of slicing vegetables paper thin. Shown above is a general process of skinning a Radish. Apprentice chef always go through this process in the beginning of their strict training. The sliced radish is so thin you can read a newspaper through it.

●Kazari bōchō (Decorative knife carving)

As Japan has four distinct seasons, many plants and flowers such as plum, sakura, iris, ivy, chrysanthemum, and pine are used with a variety of vegetables for a decorative presentation. Hana Renkon (Lotus root flower) To take advantage of this mysterious looking vegetable, it is carved around the holes to make the finished product look like a flower.

●Tai no Sanmai Oroshi (3 piece fillet for a bream)

A 3 piece filleting process consists of 2 body filets and the bones. Prepared for Sashimi and cooked dishes, it is necessary to smoothly remove all the bones and not squeeze the fish meat. There is also the 5 piece filet for the flatfish and the Daimyo filleting process for a bonito.

●Nigiri Sushi (making Sushi)

Originally, Sushi was formed as a preservation food, but the brewing of vinegars advanced to what we know now as sushi. The tangy taste of vinegar, deep flavors, and delicate aroma all play roles in the traditional way of flavoring Japanese rice in sushi.

●Dashimaki Tamago (Rolled omelet)

Flavor the whisked eggs with bonito broth and light soy sauce. Strain the eggs and cook in the egg fryer. It is a simple process yet the proportion of flavoring and controlling the temperature can affect the finished product greatly. The trained chefs know it all like the back of their hand.

●Tempura

In Kyoto, purified colza oil is used to fry Tempura. It is a primrose yellow and the taste and aroma is pleasant. The harmony of the crispy batter and ingredients is very important. Depending on the ingredients, the temperature of the oil is changed to bring out the best flavors.

●Maki sushi (Sushi rolls)

Maki sushi is an interesting dish where you can enjoy delicious seafood such as fresh fish, eel, cooked eggs, dried gourd shavings, honewort and trefoil all at once. The presentation is also colorful and pleasant to look at.

●Kazari bōchō (Decorative knife carving)

As Japan has four distinct seasons, many plants and flowers such as plum, sakura, iris, ivy, chrysanthemum, and pine are used with a variety of vegetables for a decorative presentation. Jabara Kyūri (Accordion cucumber) Careful not to cut off the cucumber, the slices are made meticulously. Then it is placed in salt water for about 20 minutes, and you will have an accordion shaped cucumber.

●Bonito Broth

The broth of kelp and bonito flakes has a very refined and tasteful flavor which is a necessary part of Kyo-Ryori. The first broth has the light flavor of kelp and bonito flakes. The second broth brings out the best of the left over flavors of the ingredients when warmed on low heat. Asides from bonito, there are many other broths taken from various ingredients such as dried sardines, shrimp, fish head, Shitake mushrooms and soybeans. Every flavor has a bitterness or sourness to it so it is important to get a clear transparent broth. The timing to remove the kelp or put in bonito flakes, raising or lowering the heat is a simple but imperative skill that needs to be acquired with time and diligence.